Stiftung Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover (TiHo)

Small intestinal transport in pigs in response to an experimental infection with Ascaris suum

Even though they play a minor role in well developed countries in humans, in modern animal farming as well as poorer regions of the world, infections with the parasite Ascaris spp. are still a widespread problem. Especially Ascaris suum is one of the roundworms with the greatest economic impact on pig farming.  It leads to significant economic losses in terms of meat production. Aside from the progress which was made in recent years in terms of investigating pathways of helminths, the exact parasitic mechanisms of depriving its host of nutrients without causing greater damage remains unknown.  

 

As many other nematodes, A. suum is found predominantly in the small intestines. There, it is suggested that the parasite causes changes in intestinal transport physiology. It was found that chicken infected with Ascaridia galli had a significantly decreased electrogenic response to glucose and alanine. Similar results were also demonstrated in studies with pigs infected with Ascaris suum. One potential explanation was searched in immunological mechanisms induced by the nematode’s presence. For example, the increase in Th2-cell-asscociated cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, which activate STAT6, might result in a decrease in sodium-linked absorption of glucose. Another approach was the phosphorylation of the apical glucose transporter SGLT1. This could alter the glucose transport by modulating the SGLT1-mediated transport. Based on recent studies, other factors such as Hif-1α may potentially change the transcription of genes involved in the barrier function. Moreover, they may transactivate the GLUT1 promoter which might lead to higher mRNA levels of GLUT1. This insight into the different mechanisms influencing the transport physiology within the small intestines enables us to gain an idea of the complexity of the impact A. suum seems to have on the epithelial cells.

 

In the first part of this study, 36 animals were orally inoculated with either 10,000 eggs in a single dose (single-infected pigs) or with 1,000 eggs daily for a period of 10 consecutive days (trickle-infected pigs). Eighteen further pigs were allocated to a control group. After different times of 21, 35 or 49 days after infection, 54 pigs equally distributed of the respective groups were sacrificed. Tissue samples were taken for measuring electrogenic transport processes in Ussing chambers as well as unidirectional glucose flux rates and for Western Blotting, qPCR and histomorphometrical analysis. Ussing chamber experiments were performed immediately after slaughter. These demonstrated significant decreases in flux rates of the single-infected group and trickle-infected group at 35 dpi in the jejunum and in the trickle-infected group at 49 dpi in the jejunum. The transport processes of peptides as well as the amino acid alanine within the trickle-infected group in the jejunum and ileum were also significantly decreased after 49 dpi.

In a second step, potential reasons for this decrease were investigated: the Western Blot technique was performed and revealed no clear explanation for the changes seen in the transport processes, neither did the qPCR or histomorphometrical analysis. The results of this study showed that it is still unclear how the parasite influences the transport physiology of the small intestines, but that an A. suum infection has an evident impact. Moreover, it was shown that this impact is at its strongest at 49 dpi within the trickle-infected group in the jejunum and ileum.

Additional studies are needed to explain the pathway these nematode use to modify the nutrient uptake and why it apparently takes a certain time period for adaptation.

Small intestinal transport in pigs in response to an experimental infection with Ascaris suum

 

Nicole Issel

 

Even though they play a minor role in well developed countries in humans, in modern animal farming as well as poorer regions of the world, infections with the parasite Ascaris spp. are still a widespread problem. Especially Ascaris suum is one of the roundworms with the greatest economic impact on pig farming.  It leads to significant economic losses in terms of meat production. Aside from the progress which was made in recent years in terms of investigating pathways of helminths, the exact parasitic mechanisms of depriving its host of nutrients without causing greater damage remains unknown.  

 

As many other nematodes, A. suum is found predominantly in the small intestines. There, it is suggested that the parasite causes changes in intestinal transport physiology. It was found that chicken infected with Ascaridia galli had a significantly decreased electrogenic response to glucose and alanine. Similar results were also demonstrated in studies with pigs infected with Ascaris suum. One potential explanation was searched in immunological mechanisms induced by the nematode’s presence. For example, the increase in Th2-cell-asscociated cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, which activate STAT6, might result in a decrease in sodium-linked absorption of glucose. Another approach was the phosphorylation of the apical glucose transporter SGLT1. This could alter the glucose transport by modulating the SGLT1-mediated transport. Based on recent studies, other factors such as Hif-1α may potentially change the transcription of genes involved in the barrier function. Moreover, they may transactivate the GLUT1 promoter which might lead to higher mRNA levels of GLUT1. This insight into the different mechanisms influencing the transport physiology within the small intestines enables us to gain an idea of the complexity of the impact A. suum seems to have on the epithelial cells.

 

In the first part of this study, 36 animals were orally inoculated with either 10,000 eggs in a single dose (single-infected pigs) or with 1,000 eggs daily for a period of 10 consecutive days (trickle-infected pigs). Eighteen further pigs were allocated to a control group. After different times of 21, 35 or 49 days after infection, 54 pigs equally distributed of the respective groups were sacrificed. Tissue samples were taken for measuring electrogenic transport processes in Ussing chambers as well as unidirectional glucose flux rates and for Western Blotting, qPCR and histomorphometrical analysis. Ussing chamber experiments were performed immediately after slaughter. These demonstrated significant decreases in flux rates of the single-infected group and trickle-infected group at 35 dpi in the jejunum and in the trickle-infected group at 49 dpi in the jejunum. The transport processes of peptides as well as the amino acid alanine within the trickle-infected group in the jejunum and ileum were also significantly decreased after 49 dpi.

In a second step, potential reasons for this decrease were investigated: the Western Blot technique was performed and revealed no clear explanation for the changes seen in the transport processes, neither did the qPCR or histomorphometrical analysis. The results of this study showed that it is still unclear how the parasite influences the transport physiology of the small intestines, but that an A. suum infection has an evident impact. Moreover, it was shown that this impact is at its strongest at 49 dpi within the trickle-infected group in the jejunum and ileum.

Additional studies are needed to explain the pathway these nematode use to modify the nutrient uptake and why it apparently takes a certain time period for adaptation.

Obwohl sie eine geringere Rolle in fortschrittlich entwickelten Ländern dieser Welt spielen, sind Infektionen mit Ascaris spp. in modernen, intensiven Tierhaltungen sowie in ärmeren Regionen dieser Welt noch immer ein weit verbreitetes Problem. Besonders Ascaris suum ist einer der Rundwürmer mit dem größten ökonomischen Einfluss auf die Schweineproduktion. Er führt zu bedeutsamen wirtschaftlichen Verlusten im Hinblick auf die Fleischproduktion. Neben den Erkenntnissen, die man in den letzten Jahren in Bezug auf die Wirkungsweise von Helminthen gewonnen hat, bleibt die genauere parasitische Wechselwirkung, den Wirt seiner Nährstoffe zu berauben, ohne dabei größeren Schaden zu verursachen, unbekannt.

Wie auch viele andere Nematoden, hält sich A. suum vor allem im Dünndarm auf. Es wird vermutet, dass der Parasit dort eine Veränderung der intestinalen Transportphysiologie bewirkt. Es wurde nachgewiesen, dass Hühner, die mit Ascaridia galli infiziert wurden, eine signifikant reduzierte Antwort in der Zunahme des Kurzschlussstroms nach mukosaler Zugabe von Glukose und Alanin gezeigt haben. Ähnliche Ergebnisse wurden im Rahmen einer Studie mit Schweinen, die mit A. suum infiziert wurden, gezeigt. Ein möglicher Erklärungsansatz wurde in immunologischen Mechanismen gesucht, die durch Präsenz des Parasiten bewirkt wurden. Beispielsweise führt die auf Th2 basierende Erhöhung der Zytokine IL-4 und Interleukin 13 zur Aktivierung von STAT6, wodurch eine Erniedrigung der natriumabhängigen Absorption von Glukose bewirkt wird. Ein anderer Ansatz wäre eine mögliche Phosphorylierung des apikalen Glukosetransporters SGLT1, was zu einer Veränderung des SGLT1-vermittelten Transports führen könnte. Basierend auf früheren Studien können auch Einflüsse aus anderen Faktoren, wie beispielsweise Hif-1α, möglicherweise durch die Veränderung der Transkriptionen von Genen, die an dem Aufbau der Barrierefunktion beteiligt sind, Einfluss auf die Transportphysiologie nehmen. Hif-1α bewirkt durch Transaktivierung des GLUT1 Transporters ebenfalls, dass höhere Mengen der mRNA von GLUT1 vorzufinden sind. Dieser Einblick der verschiedenen Wirkmechanismen, die die Transportphysiologie im Dünndarm beeinflussen können, ermöglicht uns eine Vorstellung in Anbetracht der Komplexität des Einflusses, die eine A. suum Infektion auf die Epithelzellen zu haben scheint.

 Im ersten Teil dieser Studie wurden 36 Tiere mit entweder 10.000 Eiern oral in einer einzigen Applikation (einfach-infizierte Gruppen) oder mit 1.000 Eiern täglich für eine Dauer von zehn aufeinanderfolgenden Tagen (trickle-infizierte Gruppen) infiziert. Achtzehn weitere Tiere bildeten die Kontrollgruppe. Nach verschiedenen Zeiten von 21, 35 oder 49 Tagen nach der Infektion wurden die 54 Tiere in gleicher Verteilung der jeweiligen Gruppen getötet. Das Gewebe wurde zur Messung der elektrophysiologischen Transportprozesse sowie der Ermittlung der unidirektionalen Glukosefluxraten in den Ussing Kammern verwendet und weitere Gewebeproben wurden für Western Blot, qPCR sowie morphometrische Analysen entnommen. Signifikante Erniedrigungen waren zum einen in der Glukosefluxrate im Jejunum in der einfach-infizierten und trickle-infizierten Gruppe am 35. Tag nach der Infektion und im Jejunum am 49. Tag nach der Infektion in der trickle-infizierten Gruppe zu finden. In Bezug auf die Transportprozesse von Peptiden und der Aminosäure Alanin ergaben sich in der trickle-infizierten Gruppe im Jejunum und Ileum nach 49 Tagen signifikante Erniedrigungen.

In einem zweiten Schritt wurden mögliche Ursachen für die ermittelte Erniedrigung der elektrophysiologischen Transportprozesse und unidirektionalen Glukosefluxraten gesucht: Western Blots wurden durchgeführt, deren Ergebnisse allerdings keine eindeutige Erklärung für die Veränderungen, die in den Transportprozessen und Fluxraten ergaben. Auch die durchgeführte qPCR und histomorphometrische Analyse konnten keine erklärenden Erkenntnisse bringen. Die Ergebnisse dieser Studie zeigen, dass noch immer unklar ist, wie genau der Parasit die Transportphysiologie im Dünndarm beeinflusst, aber dass A. suum Infektionen einen nachweisbaren Einfluss hat. Außerdem wurde gezeigt, dass dieser Einfluss am stärksten 49 Tage nach Infektion innerhalb der trickle-infizierten Gruppe im Jejunum und Ileum war.

Weitere Studien werden benötigt, um die Wirkweise der Nematoden hinreichend zu erklären und wie sie die Nährstoffaufnahme modifizieren können und warum es augenscheinlich eine gewisse Zeitspanne benötigt, bevor eine Anpassung etabliert werden kann.

Cite

Citation style:
Could not load citation form.

Rights

Use and reproduction:

Export